U.S. Marshals Set To Auction $4.2M In Bitcoin Next Month

The US Marshals Service (USMS) has now announced that the remaining Silk Road bitcoins will be auctioned off in early November.

submitted by nevremind to news [link] [comments]

The Decade in Blockchain — 2010 to 2020 in Review

2010

February — The first ever cryptocurrency exchange, Bitcoin Market, is established. The first trade takes place a month later.
April — The first public bitcoin trade takes place: 1000BTC traded for $30 at an exchange rate of 0.03USD/1BTC
May — The first real-world bitcoin transaction is undertaken by Laszlo Hanyecz, who paid 10000BTC for two Papa John’s pizzas (Approximately $25 USD)
June — Bitcoin developer Gavin Andreson creates a faucet offering 5 free BTC to the public
July — First notable usage of the word “blockchain” appears on BitcoinTalk forum. Prior to this, it was referred to as ‘Proof-of-Work chain’
July — Bitcoin exchange named Magic The Gathering Online eXchange—also known as Mt. Gox—established
August —Bitcoin protocol bug leads to emergency hard fork
December — Satoshi Nakamoto ceases communication with the world

2011

January — One-quarter of the eventual total of 21M bitcoins have been generated
February — Bitcoin reaches parity for the first time with USD
April — Bitcoin reaches parity with EUR and GBP
June — WikiLeaks begins accepting Bitcoin donations
June — Mt. Gox hacked, resulting in suspension of trading and a precipitous price drop for Bitcoin
August — First Bitcoin Improvement Proposal: BIP Purpose and Guidelines
October — Litecoin released
December — Bitcoin featured as a major plot element in an episode of ‘The Good Wife’ as 9.45 million viewers watch.

2012

May — Bitcoin Magazine, founded by Mihai Alisie and Vitalik Buterin, publishes first issue
July — Government of Estonia begins incorporating blockchain into digital ID efforts
September — Bitcoin Foundation created
October — BitPay reports having over 1,000 merchants accepting bitcoin under its payment processing service
November — First Bitcoin halving to 25 BTC per block

2013

February — Reddit begins accepting bitcoins for Gold memberships
March — Cyprus government bailout levies bank accounts with over $100k. Flight to Bitcoin results in major price spike.
May —Total Bitcoin value surpasses 1 billion USD with 11M Bitcoin in circulation
May — The first cryptocurrency market rally and crash takes place. Prices rise from $13 to $220, and then drop to $70
June — First major cryptocurrency theft. 25,000 BTC is stolen from Bitcoin forum founder
July — Mastercoin becomes the first project to conduct an ICO
August — U.S. Federal Court issues opinion that Bitcoin is a currency or form of money
October — The FBI shuts down dark web marketplace Silk Road, confiscating approximately 26,000 bitcoins
November — Vitalik Buterin releases the Ethereum White Paper: “A Next-Generation Smart Contract and Decentralized Application Platform
December — The first commit to the Ethereum codebase takes place

2014

January — Vitalik Buterin announces Ethereum at the North American Bitcoin Conference in Miami
February — HMRC in the UK classifies Bitcoin as private money
March — Newsweek claims Dorian Nakamoto is Bitcoin creator. He is not
April — Gavin Wood releases the Ethereum Yellow Paper: “Ethereum: A Secure Decentralised Generalised Transaction Ledger
June — Ethereum Foundation established in Zug, Switzerland
June — US Marshals Service auctions off 30,000 Bitcoin confiscated from Silk Road. All are purchased by venture capitalist Tim Draper
July — Ethereum token launch raises 31,591 BTC ($18,439,086) over 42 days
September — TeraExchange launches first U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission approved Bitcoin over-the-counter swap
October — ConsenSys is founded by Joe Lubin
December — By year’s end, Paypal, Zynga, u/, Expedia, Newegg, Dell, Dish Network, and Microsoft are all accepting Bitcoin for payments

2015

January — Coinbase opens up the first U.S-based cryptocurrency exchange
February — Stripe initiates bitcoin payment integration for merchants
April — NASDAQ initiates blockchain trial
June — NYDFS releases final version of its BitLicense virtual currency regulations
July — Ethereum’s first live mainnet release—Frontier—launched.
August — Augur, the first token launch on the Ethereum network takes place
September — R3 consortium formed with nine financial institutions, increases to over 40 members within six months
October — Gemini exchange launches, founded by Tyler and Cameron Winklevoss
November — Announcement of first zero knowledge proof, ZK-Snarks
December — Linux Foundation establishes Hyperledger project

2016

January — Zcash announced
February — HyperLedger project announced by Linux Foundation with thirty founding members
March — Second Ethereum mainnet release, Homestead, is rolled out.
April — The DAO (decentralized autonomous organization) launches a 28-day crowdsale. After one month, it raises an Ether value of more than US$150M
May — Chinese Financial Blockchain Shenzhen Consortium launches with 31 members
June — The DAO is attacked with 3.6M of the 11.5M Ether in The DAO redirected to the attacker’s Ethereum account
July — The DAO attack results in a hard fork of the Ethereum Blockchain to recover funds. A minority group rejecting the hard fork continues to use the original blockchain renamed Ethereum Classic
July — Second Bitcoin halving to 12.5BTC per block mined
November — CME Launches Bitcoin Price Index

2017

January — Bitcoin price breaks US$1,000 for the first time in three years
February — Enterprise Ethereum Alliance formed with 30 founding members, over 150 members six months later
March — Multiple applications for Bitcoin ETFs rejected by the SEC
April — Bitcoin is officially recognized as currency by Japan
June — EOS begins its year-long ICO, eventually raising $4 billion
July — Parity hack exposes weaknesses in multisig wallets
August — Bitcoin Cash forks from the Bitcoin Network
October — Ethereum releases Byzantium soft fork network upgrade, part one of Metropolis
September — China bans ICOs
October — Bitcoin price surpasses $5,000 USD for the first time
November — Bitcoin price surpasses $10,000 USD for the first time
December — Ethereum Dapp Cryptokitties goes viral, pushing the Ethereum network to its limits

2018


January — Ethereum price peaks near $1400 USD
March — Google bans all ads pertaining to cryptocurrency
March — Twitter bans all ads pertaining to cryptocurrency
April — 2018 outpaces 2017 with $6.3 billion raised in token launches in the first four months of the year
April — EU government commits $300 million to developing blockchain projects
June — The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission states that Ether is not a security.
July — Over 100,000 ERC20 tokens created
August — New York Stock Exchange owner announces Bakkt, a federally regulated digital asset exchange
October — Bitcoin’s 10th birthday
November — VC investment in blockchain tech surpasses $1 billion
December — 90% of banks in the US and Europe report exploration of blockchain tech

2019

January — Coinstar machines begin selling cryptocurrency at grocery stores across the US
February — Ethereum’s Constantinople hard fork is released, part two of Metropolis
April — Bitcoin surpasses 400 million total transactions
June — Facebook announces Libra
July — United States senate holds hearings titled ‘Examining Regulatory Frameworks for Digital Currencies and Blockchain”
August — Ethereum developer dominance reaches 4x that of any other blockchain
October — Over 80 million distinct Ethereum addresses have been created
September — Santander bank settles both sides of a $20 million bond on Ethereum
November — Over 3000 Dapps created. Of them, 2700 are built on Ethereum
submitted by blockstasy to CryptoTechnology [link] [comments]

Bitcoin value + FBI seizures?

Disclaimer - I'm not super well-versed in the topic of cryptocurrency or economics, so forgive me if I'm misunderstanding something. I'm trying to understand why bitcoin's value is so outrageous right now. I also just happened to notice a few other bitcoin-related happenings that seem to have coincided at similar points in time.
Right before the value surge of btc, Alphabay was seized by the FBI in June. In late July I believe (?), BTC-e was seized as well. Apparently, $4m in btc were seized from Alphabay and Hansa. "45%" of btc value was confiscated from BTC-e. I couldn't find the exact amount here that was seized. I am pretty sure that the seizure of Silk Road in 2013 was the only previous FBI confiscation of a dark-web market before Alphabay and Hansa. Alphabay was the next largest dark market created in 2014 following Silk Road. Alphabay and Hansa were both seized by FBI; Alphabay went "down" first, and then when users switched to Hansa, the feds copped them all too. The FBI's liquidation of btc following the Silk Road incident pulls up very few news results when I look it up. I guess the FBI had initially found 27,000 btc ($18m USD at the time), but updated that they had seized 144,000 of Ulbricht's btc out of the 600,000 that he had stored in encrypted wallets or whatever. Haven't seen any updates since then lol. The US Marshal service sold that 27,000 btc for around $17m, and another 144,000 recovered from Ulbricht's personal stash that were auctioned off over time. Silk Road was shut down in October of 2013, and shortly after in November, the value of btc spiked tenfold - from around $100 to $1200 (according to Wikipedia and a quick google search of the news in 2013). The seizure of those dark markets and BTC-e hardly gathered any news attention at all.
There are theories out there that btc could surge up to $25k before leveling off again. I've heard that it's an economic bubble that has formed arbitrarily, that it's going to burst, etc. I've also read that blocks of miners have released bitcoin cash and the whole segwit2x ordeal (which is all way over my head, just that this had supposedly led to a surge in value). I do think it seems odd that the two most popular, trafficked dark markets were seized mere months before insane btc value surges. I don't think that the DOJ is trying to raise money for itself--it would keep btc indefinitely if that were so, and wait for surges to auction them off. I just find it strange that these major monetary seizures are occurring before major booms in btc worth--not just in 2017, but in 2013 as well.
The fact that this has happened twice now seems too odd to be a coincidence, but hey, maybe I'm just a crazy conspiracy theorist. But I can't think of any rational link between the two events, or economic explanation...I guess maybe if a large amount of circulating btc was being stored within each markets' servers, and that btc was then confiscated, that would lead to an increase in demand? And then the boom just keeps building? This is the only thing that makes sense to me, at least.
What do you guys think??
Here are links to some of the stuff I referenced if anyone's interested. It gets pretty spooky.
http://money.cnn.com/2013/11/29/investing/bitcoin-gold/index.html https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_bitcoin#Prices_and_value_history
https://www.forbes.com/sites/kashmirhill/2013/10/04/fbi-silk-road-bitcoin-seizure/2/#4141ba6b5eb0
http://www.foxnews.com/world/2012/06/16/dirty-money-where-does-it-all-go.html
https://www.coindesk.com/btc-es-big-claim-bitcoin-withdrawals-begin-tomorrow/
https://www.coindesk.com/bitcoin-exchange-btc-e-promises-daily-updates-relaunch-attempt/
https://thehackernews.com/2017/07/alphabay-hansa-darkweb-markets-seized.html
submitted by lilybuggz to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

What do you think will the effect of auctioning of 44,341 bitcoins by US Marshalls on the current bull run?

The US Marshall Service has been auctioning of Silk Road assets for the past year. The final auction will include 44,341 bitcoins or more than $15 million worth. The auction is set to take place between a six-hour period, starting at 8 a.m. and ending at 2 p.m. on November 5.
submitted by hsaleem to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Subreddit Stats: RedditDayOf top posts from 2015-12-23 to 2016-12-21 16:33 PDT

Period: 364.54 days
Submissions Comments
Total 1000 6566
Rate (per day) 2.74 17.97
Unique Redditors 311 2698
Combined Score 83364 32293

Top Submitters' Top Submissions

  1. 8084 points, 78 submissions: joelschlosberg
    1. actress Linda Hamilton has a twin sister who made it possible for Terminator 2 to film some scenes in one camera shot without compositing (396 points, 15 comments)
    2. Ben Franklin's daily schedule (353 points, 29 comments)
    3. historical marker (314 points, 4 comments)
    4. Isaac Asimov tells a joke involving profanity (300 points, 9 comments)
    5. The swordfights in The Princess Bride, Stanley Kubrick's Barry Lyndon, Highlander, The Mask of Zorro, Die Another Day, The Lord of the Rings, and Pirates of the Caribbean were all made by the same sword master, "the man who stabbed Errol Flynn". Who also did Darth Vader's lightsaber dueling himself. (281 points, 9 comments)
    6. Girl Scouts were told by their official handbook that "you should not be hostile to" Jews and Muslims as early as the 1918 edition. (278 points, 26 comments)
    7. "I hate versions that make Watson stupid. What makes Holmes impressive is that he outthinks smart people, not that he outthinks stupid people." (254 points, 3 comments)
    8. a joke from Isaac Asimov's Treasury of Humor (254 points, 18 comments)
    9. a tiny but full-featured solar-powered movie theater (236 points, 14 comments)
    10. Jetta, the teen-ager from the futuristic 21st century in a pre-Jetsons comic drawn by Archie Comics artist Dan DeCarlo (197 points, 9 comments)
  2. 6984 points, 104 submissions: 0and18
    1. Man Pays $10K For House, Finds $107,000 Comic Book Hidden In Wall (241 points, 13 comments)
    2. xkcd: The Three Laws of Robotics (234 points, 2 comments)
    3. FDA Lifts Decades-Old 32 Year Old Ban On Blood Donations By Gay Men (233 points, 31 comments)
    4. This is Why You Should Never Release 1.5 Million Balloons At Once (191 points, 30 comments)
    5. Teaching Methods (188 points, 2 comments)
    6. Pirámide de Mayo In Argentina covered with photos of all the "disappeared" during the Dirty War (154 points, 2 comments)
    7. In 1958, Mao Zedong ordered all sparrows to be killed. As a direct result, millions of people starved to death. (150 points, 7 comments)
    8. Without leap years, today would be July 15, 2017 Explained in Graphics (148 points, 3 comments)
    9. Film poster for the Rocketeer (135 points, 5 comments)
    10. William Kamkwamba: At age 14, in poverty and famine, a Malawian boy built a windmill to power his family's home (131 points, 3 comments)
  3. 6687 points, 50 submissions: sverdrupian
    1. An adult oyster is capable of filtering 25-50 gallons of water a day. (1030 points, 72 comments)
    2. Making chain. (290 points, 18 comments)
    3. A series of tunnels in Taiwan (261 points, 6 comments)
    4. Artichoke in full bloom (242 points, 2 comments)
    5. USS CONSTITUTION in drydock for restoration - Launched in Boston in 1797, she's the oldest commissioned warship afloat (220 points, 24 comments)
    6. German WW1-era map calling out the Allies for the hypocrisy of promoting self-determination while simultaneously holding vast colonial empires. (202 points, 26 comments)
    7. "Our future is an airport without delays" - 1975 advertisement (189 points, 14 comments)
    8. Bee macro. (184 points, 4 comments)
    9. Het Gekkenhuis - a Dutch caricature map of Europe, 1914. (180 points, 2 comments)
    10. The oarfish, the world's largest known bony fish, is thought to have spawned tales of seas serpents. (178 points, 25 comments)
  4. 4762 points, 58 submissions: wormspermgrrl
    1. During Florida winters, manatees flock to nuclear and coal power plants for the warm water discharges. (414 points, 29 comments)
    2. Happy Birthday song ruled public domain as judge throws out copyright claim (202 points, 8 comments)
    3. 18 cities in Pennsylvania reported higher levels of lead exposure than Flint (194 points, 8 comments)
    4. xkcd: Log Scale (191 points, 8 comments)
    5. Parade Magazine's Ask Marilyn Controversy: The Time Everyone “Corrected” the World’s Smartest Woman (174 points, 18 comments)
    6. Maryam Mirzakhani won the Fields Medal in 2014; she is the first woman to win math’s most prestigious prize (163 points, 1 comment)
    7. Meet the woman who makes fake fingers for Japan's reformed gangsters (161 points, 3 comments)
    8. Google's self-driving car gets pulled over for driving too slowly (157 points, 40 comments)
    9. The Wieliczka Salt Mine, Poland (154 points, 12 comments)
    10. The Decemberists - "The Mariner's Revenge Song" (149 points, 14 comments)
  5. 2906 points, 31 submissions: jaykirsch
    1. 1989 Plymouth Voyager III concept. This is a two piece detachable vehicle (link in comments) (220 points, 21 comments)
    2. "Mission Accomplished" fly-in and speech May 1, 2003. Enormous political PR blunder. (206 points, 5 comments)
    3. Prepared for gas attack in France, WW1 (202 points, 6 comments)
    4. Les Paul with Paul McCartney and a Gibson left-handed "Special." 1988 (201 points, 9 comments)
    5. "Pictured Rocks" on Lake Superior near Munising, MI (180 points, 7 comments)
    6. Art Deco in the home - stylish 1937 GE radio (146 points, 9 comments)
    7. Woody Guthrie on the attack, 1941 (141 points, 2 comments)
    8. The Great 1918 Influenza Pandemic claimed more lives than WW1, including 675,000 (est.) Americans. (Article link in comments) (135 points, 6 comments)
    9. Come on in, kids, I have some pie and a magic mushroom. (129 points, 10 comments)
    10. Yooper "Pastie" in Michigan's UP (122 points, 25 comments)
  6. 2882 points, 23 submissions: appropriate-username
    1. "We come in peace" (470 points, 10 comments)
    2. This GIF illustrates why your phone camera takes weird photos of revolving propellers. (325 points, 12 comments)
    3. An electrical current causing water to form a bridge. (xpost/gifs) (276 points, 10 comments)
    4. This series of photos got the photographer banned from Magic TCG tournaments and is among the top 5 top posts of all time on Reddit (266 points, 33 comments)
    5. "My girlfriend keeps sending me her squids" (245 points, 9 comments)
    6. Pocky is a popular Japanese snack consisting of a cracker-like stick partially covered in chocolate--I can't believe nobody posted it so I can upvote it. Here's a picture of Pocky; the wiki article on it is in the comments. (177 points, 46 comments)
    7. An animated short about a lazy guy in space--35th most popular reddit post of all time (158 points, 10 comments)
    8. xkcd: Centrifugal Force (124 points, 3 comments)
    9. 1,000 x 1,000 x 1,000 Rubik's Cube Solve (by a computer) (114 points, 10 comments)
    10. xkcd: Earth Temperature Timeline (86 points, 4 comments)
  7. 2385 points, 30 submissions: sbroue
    1. Flying hammock [gif] (275 points, 13 comments)
    2. Property for Rent: No Asians (224 points, 17 comments)
    3. Gobi warns his shrimp housekeeper of approaching predator (140 points, 11 comments)
    4. First taste of chocolate for Ivory Coast Cocoa farmers (126 points, 10 comments)
    5. "Hurricane" Higgins finishes the match [gif] (119 points, 17 comments)
    6. Big Booty Bitches (Original Video) (116 points, 16 comments)
    7. The Blessing and launching of HMS Albion (1898) created a wave that drowned 39 people, you see them bottom left in some of the earliest disaster footage (110 points, 6 comments)
    8. Pizza with mini meat-pies baked in the crust Australian frankenfood (106 points, 6 comments)
    9. Bought for £1, the mysterious tower that inspired JRR Tolkien (101 points, 1 comment)
    10. Castro meets Nixon: April 1959 [pic] (100 points, 4 comments)
  8. 1687 points, 32 submissions: ceegee1975
    1. Nicolas Cage returns stolen dinosaur skull he bought at auction for $276,000 (192 points, 11 comments)
    2. Why Hypercolor T-Shirts Were Just a One-Hit Wonder (99 points, 15 comments)
    3. Clean My Space. A youtube channel devoted to cleaning just about anything (98 points, 3 comments)
    4. Scientists have breached the blood-brain barrier for the first time to treat a brain tumour (83 points, 2 comments)
    5. They Might Be Giants-Ana Ng (78 points, 8 comments)
    6. How It's Made: Balloons (74 points, 4 comments)
    7. Mr. Bean The Movie - 'Gun' Scene (72 points, 6 comments)
    8. The Best Homemade Girl Scout Cookie Recipes (71 points, 5 comments)
    9. Monty Python - How Not to Be Seen (68 points, 2 comments)
    10. George Carlin - Euphemisms (65 points, 8 comments)
  9. 1623 points, 13 submissions: mrekted
    1. Legendary con man, scam artist, and forger Frank Abagnale Jr. pictured in the pilots seat of a Pan Am airliner. He flew over 1,000,000 miles while wearing a Pan Am uniform. He was never their employee, nor was he a pilot. (484 points, 24 comments)
    2. What It's Like When Reddit Wrongly Accuses Your Loved One Of Murder - The Boston Marathon Bomber Reddit Witch Hunt (240 points, 23 comments)
    3. Tim's Vermeer - Penn Jillette chronicles a mans ridiculously compulsive and obsessive five year obsession with reverse engineering and mastering the artistic techniques of Dutch master painter Vermeer (148 points, 6 comments)
    4. Cadillac Ranch, Amarillo TX. A bizarre, macabre tribute to the American love affair with the automobile. Visitors are encouraged to add their own ideas and messages to the memorial with spray paint. (133 points, 7 comments)
    5. 2010 - Reddit comes to the aid of a terminally ill little girl who was being cruelly harassed by her neighbors (126 points, 7 comments)
    6. In 2013, a UK man scoured the local dump after realizing he threw away a hard disk that contained 7500 bitcoins. At current market value those coins are worth a little over 5.5 million USD. (125 points, 4 comments)
    7. A float in the first Macy's Day Parade in 1924 (95 points, 1 comment)
    8. On Halloween 1938, Orson Welles enters legend with a radio play that convinced listeners that the planet was under attack by aliens from outer space (68 points, 1 comment)
    9. That's one fuckin' nice kitty right there. (51 points, 0 comments)
    10. Stampedes, pepper spray, fist fights, shootouts, and death. This is Black Friday in the United States. (49 points, 4 comments)
  10. 1535 points, 23 submissions: themanwhosleptin
    1. The reason why The Simpsons are yellow is because the creator Matt Groening wanted them to be recognizable when you flip through channels on the TV (194 points, 7 comments)
    2. Shoes (189 points, 3 comments)
    3. On April Fool's Day 2014, NPR posted a fake article on its Facebook page titled "Why Doesn't America Read Anymore?" When clicking on the post, the article asks its readers to not comment on it. Not surprisingly, many people commented anyway. (167 points, 7 comments)
    4. Gran Torino (2008) - a film about an elderly racist Korean War vet, his Hmong neighbors, and their struggles with street gangs (115 points, 11 comments)
    5. Napoleon's Exile In Saint Helena (91 points, 2 comments)
    6. Munchkin - a card game that parodies tabletop RPGs) (90 points, 7 comments)
    7. Meet Brother Najeeb Michael, the monk who saved thousands of manuscripts from IS jihadists (66 points, 1 comment)
    8. The Jimmy Timmy Power Hour - a television crossover film trilogy set between the universes in The Adventures of Jimmy Neutron: Boy Genius and The Fairly OddParents (66 points, 2 comments)
    9. Tibetan Monks and Nuns Turn Their Minds Toward Science (51 points, 1 comment)
    10. The Rule of Thirds - a fundamental technique in photography (47 points, 0 comments)
  11. 1218 points, 14 submissions: justtoclick
    1. "Do it yourself doodler" album (359 points, 8 comments)
    2. If Harry Potter was an anime series (171 points, 37 comments)
    3. The Muppets explain Phenomenology (122 points, 4 comments)
    4. Hawaii Still Has a Leprosy Colony With Six Patients (94 points, 17 comments)
    5. David Bowie song 'Changes' inspired Brandon Flowers to form The Killers (59 points, 4 comments)
    6. Dave Barry’s 2015 Year in Review (57 points, 1 comment)
    7. U.S. Muslims to overtake Jews by 2026 (53 points, 9 comments)
    8. The Beatles Play Ed Sullivan: The Historic TV Appearance Heralding the British Invasion (52 points, 0 comments)
    9. The Evolution of Batman's Bat Symbol [Infographic] (51 points, 10 comments)
    10. Cycling With the Psycos -- Counterculture feminism in East L.A (48 points, 0 comments)
  12. 1191 points, 14 submissions: Lillyclown
    1. A Pocket Guide to Vaginal Euphemisms (197 points, 33 comments)
    2. The story behind the McDonalds hot coffee lawsuit (165 points, 28 comments)
    3. The Polish Beer Drinking Party (PPPP), orginally a satirical political party to promote beer, not vodka, and fight alcoholism, won 16 seats in the 1991 parliamentary election. Later splitting to Big Beer and Little Beer. (126 points, 6 comments)
    4. History of Color (115 points, 3 comments)
    5. The Chemistry of Ice Cream (89 points, 6 comments)
    6. 150 year old sunken steam boat's contents. Including still edible food! (87 points, 3 comments)
    7. The Strangest, Most Spectacular Bridge Collapse (65 points, 7 comments)
    8. All Blacks haka (61 points, 1 comment)
    9. The Poisoning of a City (61 points, 0 comments)
    10. British Police use Tea as a perfect analogy for sexual consent. (57 points, 9 comments)
  13. 1147 points, 14 submissions: Radu316
    1. There's a statue of Lenin at the Pole of Inaccessibility in Antarctica. It was on top of a Soviet research station in the 60s. Abandoned in '67, it was forgotten until 2007 when it was rediscovered by a team of explorers. By then, the statue was the only part still visible. (167 points, 2 comments)
    2. Strelka was one of the first animals in space to return safely. She became a sensation in the Soviet Union and had puppies with cosmo-dog Pushok. Nikita Khrushchev gave a puppy, Pushinka, to JFK as a gift. She also had puppies and Strelka's bloodline is still alive in the United States. (147 points, 7 comments)
    3. The Turk was an 18th century chess-playing automaton. It went on a tour of Europe and America, defeating noted chess players like Ben Franklin and Napoleon. After being destroyed in a fire, it was revealed to be a hoax - a person (usually a chessmaster) hid inside and operated it. (136 points, 10 comments)
    4. "Houston, we have a problem" is a slight misquote popularized by the Apollo 13 movie. The real line was actually "Houston, we've had a problem" and was first said by astronaut John Swigert, not mission captain Jim Lovell. (115 points, 14 comments)
    5. Marginalia are all the various scribbles and comments made in margins of books or documents. In medieval times, religious texts written by nuns and monks featured marginalia with all sorts of vulgar images and dirty jokes. (96 points, 5 comments)
    6. Brain crater on Mars. The bizarre texture of the crater floor makes it resemble a brain. NASA worked out that, at 0.6 miles wide, the brain is about the right size to fit inside the mound known as the Face of Mars. (90 points, 0 comments)
    7. Statue of Alexander the Great taming Bucephalus. Bucephalus is often regarded as the most famous (real) horse in history. According to Plutarch, the horse died at the Battle of the Hydaspes in 326 BC. Afterwards Alexander founded the city of Bucephalia in his honor somewhere in modern day Pakistan. (81 points, 4 comments)
    8. Pretty much everything there is to know about tartan (aka plaid in America). The pattern of the kilt can be used to display your family background, royal lineage, service in specific branches of the military, even your name. You can even register new ones at the Scottish Register of Tartans. (79 points, 4 comments)
    9. "There's a sucker born every minute" is a quote attributed to P.T. Barnum, but it was actually said by David Hannum, one of his competitors. Hannum said it referring to people who paid to see Barnum's Cardiff Giant instead of his original, not realizing that both were fake. (60 points, 0 comments)
    10. Heart of Neolithic Orkney is a 5,000-year old world heritage site in Scotland. It includes four monuments: two ceremonial stone circles, a tomb and a former village called Skara Brae. Skara Brae is sometimes called "Scottish Pompeii" because it is so well-preserved. (47 points, 2 comments)
  14. 1128 points, 13 submissions: StochasticLife
    1. Banned until the 1980's, rock music in the USSR was smuggled around the country on records made from X Ray film. They were called 'Ribs' or 'Bone Records'. (216 points, 14 comments)
    2. Lithuania has only ever had a single king, Mindaugus. He was crowned king in 1251 and assassinated in 1263. (157 points, 5 comments)
    3. Russian had a monopoly on Vodka for over 400 years (1540's - 1992) and at one point Vodka sales made up 40% of the state's revenue (130 points, 8 comments)
    4. A nickelodeon was a hastily assembled movie theater, often setup in converted store fronts, that charged a nickle for admission. They were most popular between 1905 and 1915.) (114 points, 0 comments)
    5. Christopher Hitchen's video - Mother Theresa Hell's Angel, a critical look at her political relationships and the nature of her charitable practices. (109 points, 11 comments)
    6. Zatoichi, about a blind swordsmen, is one of Japan longest running film and TV series with over 27 films and 100 TV Episodes. (91 points, 6 comments)
    7. The oldest (surviving), and largest, Baha'i house of worship is in Wilmette Illiniois.) (64 points, 8 comments)
    8. Some humans (all women) are tetrachromats and are capable of seeing millions of colors the rest of us can't see (60 points, 10 comments)
    9. Geddy Lee of Rush was born in Canada to parents who were Polish Immigrants and holocaust survivors of Auschwitz, Dachu, and Bergen-Belsen. (50 points, 2 comments)
    10. North Korea prints the best counterfeit $100 (USD) bills in the world; they have been dubbed the 'Supernote' (45 points, 0 comments)
  15. 910 points, 8 submissions: frigate
    1. Salmon farmers choose the desired orangness-pinkness of their product from a colour chart (SalmoFan) provided by a company which supplies the food dyes to colour farmed salmon that would otherwise be gray, khaki, pale yellow, or pale pink (191 points, 10 comments)
    2. Kurt Vonnegut humorously graphs the shapes of stories (162 points, 5 comments)
    3. The Highway Hi-Fi: the short-lived record player designed for use in automobiles in the 1950's (155 points, 10 comments)
    4. H&M is making a $99 wedding dress. Here’s what that says about economics. (138 points, 43 comments)
    5. How a Math Genius Hacked OkCupid to Find True Love (100 points, 18 comments)
    6. A few of the most impressive and iconic pipe organs from around the world (81 points, 3 comments)
    7. Truth and Reconciliation Commission: By the numbers – The odds of a child dying in a residential school were about the same as a Canadian soldier dying in World War 2 (48 points, 2 comments)
    8. Gordon Lightfoot superfans cherish every show – "Lightfoot lifers" are fans of Gordon Lightfoot who see as many performances as possible (35 points, 1 comment)
  16. 854 points, 5 submissions: CryptoCollectibles
    1. Cows Playing With Hay .gif (351 points, 24 comments)
    2. Super Antics #8 by Kerry Callen (303 points, 18 comments)
    3. This Ad for /Bitcoin made Two Years Ago, As relevant today as ever describing CryptoCurrency (114 points, 3 comments)
    4. How to Draw Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles from 1986 (43 points, 1 comment)
    5. DIY: 25 Wearable Geek Projects You Can Knit or Crochet (43 points, 0 comments)
  17. 698 points, 7 submissions: goofballl
    1. Hongdae's (in Seoul) Love Museum features a single exhibit on the history of pornography in Korea. The rest of the museum is taken up with interactive sex-related photo ops. (203 points, 6 comments)
    2. Last known VCR maker stopped production in July, 40 years after VHS format launch (140 points, 9 comments)
    3. Although the exact cause for vitiligo remains unknown, it is thought to be caused by the immune system attacking and destroying the melanocytes of the skin. It famously affected Michael Jackson, causing sections of his skin to lighten over time. (106 points, 13 comments)
    4. Utchari, one of the most difficult moves in sumo, requires a wrestler to lift their opponent entirely off the ground and throw him behind and to the side. (89 points, 7 comments)
    5. Yamadera (lit. mountain temple) is a temple complex found in Yamagata Prefecture after a thousand step climb. It's where the poet Matsuo Basho penned his famous haiku: In the stillness/the cry of the cicada/penetrates the rock. (88 points, 10 comments)
    6. Cauliflower ear occurs when a blood clot forms between ear cartilage and connective tissue. This causes the cartilage to die, creating a deformity common to grappling sports like wrestling. (39 points, 3 comments)
    7. Guillain–Barré syndrome is an autoimmune disorder in which the body's immune system mistakenly attacks the peripheral nerves and damages their myelin insulation. During the disease, only a third of afflicted people are able to walk, and the exact cause of the disease can remain unknown. (33 points, 0 comments)
  18. 698 points, 7 submissions: E_Pluriscoop_Unum
    1. Roger Ebert: "Ponyo [is] one of the very rare movies where I want to sit in the front row, to drown in it. This is more than “artistry.” It is art." (211 points, 11 comments)
    2. Chocolate Rain - Tay Zonday (138 points, 7 comments)
    3. Billy West, the voice of Nickelodeon, talking about some of his voices. (122 points, 7 comments)
    4. Pingu - A beloved children's show from Switzerland (68 points, 5 comments)
    5. Nümberwang - Mitchell & Webb (58 points, 0 comments)
    6. A point about drawing swords (57 points, 3 comments)
    7. Werner Herzog's Disoriented Penguin (44 points, 3 comments)

Top Commenters

  1. wil (3635 points, 155 comments)
  2. 0and18 (584 points, 284 comments)
  3. wormspermgrrl (350 points, 214 comments)
  4. joelschlosberg (334 points, 58 comments)
  5. twitch1982 (222 points, 19 comments)
  6. balrogath (218 points, 36 comments)
  7. justtoclick (216 points, 38 comments)
  8. sverdrupian (199 points, 31 comments)
  9. appropriate-username (154 points, 49 comments)
  10. jaykirsch (151 points, 51 comments)
  11. davidystephenson (145 points, 7 comments)
  12. mrekted (138 points, 5 comments)
  13. no-fun-at-parties (136 points, 17 comments)
  14. Neebat (128 points, 17 comments)
  15. ceegee1975 (112 points, 45 comments)
  16. Disaster_Area (111 points, 4 comments)
  17. markevens (108 points, 8 comments)
  18. raendrop (107 points, 11 comments)
  19. Hazlzz (103 points, 6 comments)
  20. sunnieskye1 (99 points, 14 comments)
  21. Otterfan (96 points, 9 comments)
  22. sbroue (95 points, 18 comments)
  23. xkcd_transcriber (95 points, 11 comments)
  24. DnMarshall (95 points, 5 comments)
  25. rlbond86 (94 points, 15 comments)

Top Submissions

  1. An adult oyster is capable of filtering 25-50 gallons of water a day. by sverdrupian (1030 points, 72 comments)
  2. I was a child star in the 80s. AMA by wil (574 points, 535 comments)
  3. Legendary con man, scam artist, and forger Frank Abagnale Jr. pictured in the pilots seat of a Pan Am airliner. He flew over 1,000,000 miles while wearing a Pan Am uniform. He was never their employee, nor was he a pilot. by mrekted (484 points, 24 comments)
  4. "We come in peace" by appropriate-username (470 points, 10 comments)
  5. The anime Ghost Stories was a mediocre show without much to write home about. However, when it came time to translate it to English, the dub team was given enough leeway that they pretty much parodied the original material. The results are hilarious. by selfproclaimed (439 points, 38 comments)
  6. During Florida winters, manatees flock to nuclear and coal power plants for the warm water discharges. by wormspermgrrl (414 points, 29 comments)
  7. A brief Batman comic by Czarry (396 points, 8 comments)
  8. actress Linda Hamilton has a twin sister who made it possible for Terminator 2 to film some scenes in one camera shot without compositing by joelschlosberg (396 points, 15 comments)
  9. "Do it yourself doodler" album by justtoclick (359 points, 8 comments)
  10. Ben Franklin's daily schedule by joelschlosberg (353 points, 29 comments)

Top Comments

  1. 175 points: wil's comment in I was a child star in the 80s. AMA
  2. 137 points: wil's comment in I was a child star in the 80s. AMA
  3. 135 points: wil's comment in I was a child star in the 80s. AMA
  4. 101 points: wil's comment in I was a child star in the 80s. AMA
  5. 101 points: wil's comment in I was a child star in the 80s. AMA
  6. 92 points: wil's comment in I was a child star in the 80s. AMA
  7. 92 points: wil's comment in I was a child star in the 80s. AMA
  8. 87 points: deleted's comment in Cause of Death for Yuri Gagarin, 1st Man in Space, Finally Revealed
  9. 86 points: markevens's comment in Woman ruins marriage on game show and still loses
  10. 84 points: wil's comment in I was a child star in the 80s. AMA
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The Bitcoin hustle song - Tim Draper’s story Feat: Tadros Brothers & Bitcoin Prediction 250k In 2022 7/2/14 - Russia softens to Bitcoin, Dogecoin Foundation 2.0, & Coinbase puts it all in the Vault $53 Mil In Bitcoin To Be Auctioned U.S. Government Receives Approval to Sell Bitcoin, Bitcoin Cash Seized From Dark Web Dealer US Marshals Service To Auction Seized Bitcoins - YouTube

The U.S. Marshals Service plans to auction more than 4,000 bitcoin, worth about $37.7 million at press time, later this month. On November 5th, the United States Marshals Service, one of the oldest agencies in America, held an online auction for around 660 bitcoin seized during recent U.S. law enforcement activities and court proceedings. The US Marshals Service is selling another chunk of Silk Road bitcoins. The 44,341 BTC, to be sold in blocks of 2,000 bitcoin, will go on sale from 12:00 UTC to 18:00 UTC on November 5, 2015. Der United States Marshals Service (USMS) wird am 4. November 660 Bitcoin versteigern. Interessierte müssen sich für die Auktion offiziell anmelden und eine finanzielle Sicherheitsleistung in Höhe von 200.000 US-Dollar zahlen. USMS wird beschlagnahmte BTC während 7 Auktionen versteigern Bitcoin Auction. If you have plans of expanding your Bitcoin portfolio, then maybe you’d want to mark your calendar as US Marshals agency announced that it plans to auction $4.3 million worth of Bitcoin on November 2018. The US Marshals Service is a law enforcement agency that was established in 1789. It is an agency that is within the US ...

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The Bitcoin hustle song - Tim Draper’s story Feat: Tadros Brothers & Bitcoin Prediction 250k In 2022

#805 Maxthon BSV Browser, Krypto Token Luxus Oldtimer & Bitcoin Auktion US Marshal Service - Duration: 10:52. Bitcoin Informant 2,159 views. 10:52. Language: English ... Bitcoin startup Vaurum announced today that Silicon Valley venture capitalist Tim Draper was the sole winning bidder of the US Marshals Service's 30,000 auctioned bitcoins, and is quote ... On Thursday, the US Marshals Service said that the government will hold an auction of about 3,813 bitcoins that were seized in federal criminal, civil and ad... #805 Maxthon BSV Browser, Krypto Token Luxus Oldtimer & Bitcoin Auktion US Marshal Service - Duration: 10:52. Bitcoin Informant 2,086 views. New; 10:52. School Rugby Action - u/16 Pionier vs ... Bitcoin passed US$1,000 on 28 November 2013 at Mt. Gox. Prices fell to around $400 in April 2014, before rallying in the middle of the year. They then declined to not much more than $200 in early ...

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