Armory Wallet Review 2020: Fees, Pros, Cons and Features ...

[Reupload][Tutorial] Install Armory Wallet 0.96.4 on Fedora Workstation 29 /r/Bitcoin

[Reupload][Tutorial] Install Armory Wallet 0.96.4 on Fedora Workstation 29 /Bitcoin submitted by cryptoallbot to cryptoall [link] [comments]

[Reupload][Tutorial] Install Armory Wallet 0.96.4 on Fedora Workstation 29 /r/Bitcoin

[Reupload][Tutorial] Install Armory Wallet 0.96.4 on Fedora Workstation 29 /Bitcoin submitted by ABitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

[Tutorial] Install Armory Wallet 0.96.4 on Fedora Workstation 29 /r/Bitcoin

[Tutorial] Install Armory Wallet 0.96.4 on Fedora Workstation 29 /Bitcoin submitted by ABitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

[Tutorial] Install Armory Wallet 0.96.4 on Fedora Workstation 29 /r/Bitcoin

[Tutorial] Install Armory Wallet 0.96.4 on Fedora Workstation 29 /Bitcoin submitted by cryptoallbot to cryptoall [link] [comments]

Tutorial: Coinkite Multisig Vault with Bitcoin Armory Lockbox [video]

Tutorial: Coinkite Multisig Vault with Bitcoin Armory Lockbox [video] submitted by rnvk to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Video tutorial on how to install Bitcoin Armory in Ubuntu 14.04

Video tutorial on how to install Bitcoin Armory in Ubuntu 14.04 submitted by knahrvorn to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Armory Tutorial - Offline Transactions in 5 minutes -- (/r/Bitcoin x-post)

Armory Tutorial - Offline Transactions in 5 minutes -- (/Bitcoin x-post) submitted by Anen-o-me to BitcoinWallet [link] [comments]

Patch 0.8.0.1208

Patch has been Released!

The 0.8.0.1208 update has added the new Interchange map and new game mechanics to Escape from Tarkov
We are happy to announce the release of a major update, 0.8.0.1208, for the closed beta version of multiplayer online FPS Escape from Tarkov. This game update introduces the new Interchange map, modern and somewhat atypical compared to the rest of Tarkov locations so far. The Interchange, besides obvious highways, features a huge shopping mall with shops and restaurants. The new location provides conditions for honing new confined space combat tactics. It should be noted that for some time after the update there will not be any AI adversaries on the location, they will be added in the following patches. Also, traditionally, along with a new location, we have introduced a new trader - Ragman, who sells everything related to garments and equipment.
We also would like to announce that the current update applied new, experimental methods for optimizing the handling of game physics on client and server, as well as new means to reduce network latency. In addition, specifically for the new Interchange map, new object rendering optimization technology was applied. Over the course of the upcoming testing, these methods will be applied to other locations as well, resulting in an additional performance gain. We admit that in the process of testing the new game update, you may experience various problems associated with new methods of optimization and new game features. All the emerging problems will be processed through the system of bug reports and promptly fixed. Moreover, the launcher was updated as well, along with numerous other fixes and changes. The new EFT update has also introduced a basic training that is going to help new players to understand and master the basic mechanics of the game faster and better.
"As promised, we are gradually and continuously introducing new features and realistic mechanics," said Nikita Buyanov, the head of Battlestate Games. "So, after this update, players will have to spend more time on loading and unloading of the magazines, check the number of cartridges in the magazine and chamber. Note that different magazines affect the loading/unloading rate differently, and there is now a new specialized character skill - Mag Drills."
Other additions to the game content include new weapons, among them, the Springfield Armory M1A, Remington 870, AAR, APB and new models of AK including 100-series as well as numerous items for weapon modification. Overall, more than 60 new gear and equipment items were added to the game, including bags and vests, body armors and helmets, weapon modifications, ammunition and medicine cases, hats, glasses, and balaclavas. A detailed list of the new equipment was previously posted on our official website of the game and in the social network communities. You can find the patch notes below!
Finally, the update has been combined with the long-anticipated profile reset (wipe).
The following updates, among other improvements and changes, are going to further improve the project performance, network quality, bug fixes, and add new game combat mechanics. Soon, Escape from Tarkov is scheduled to feature the advanced armor system, flea market, Hideout and other features that were mentioned in the plans for 2018. Development and testing of the future innovations are already underway. Also, the test results of this update will have a crucial influence on deciding the Open Beta launch date. We are sure you are excited for all this as much as we are.

Patch Notes

Please take note that first hours after the update servers may experience heavy load leading to increased matching time possible network delays.
Please, take into consideration that this update is a part of the Closed Beta testing. Some of the introduced innovations can potentially lead to previously unknown issues or bugs. Please be sure to report all discovered issues through the launcher built-in bug report system. This will help fix them promptly.
This update comes with a profile reset/wipe. All bonus gears can be obtained again from your profile.
Added:
Time-consuming loading/unloading of ammo
  • Loading/unloading of ammo into the magazine does not happen instantly. The time required to load/unload one cartridge may vary depending on the magazine and the level of the new skill, Mag drills.
  • Time is spent on loading and unloading ammo in the raid only, in the menu the procedures stay the same as before.
  • Loading and unloading can only be done with inventory open. If you close it or switch tabs, loading or unloading is interrupted. The cartridges that were already loaded into the mag, stay in it (and vice versa in case of unloading).
  • Only one magazine can be loaded or unloaded simultaneously.
  • The Info window displays the loading/unloading and mag check speed bonus if it is not 0.
  • If you’ve started loading an empty mag, or unloading a full one, the precise number of rounds is displayed.
Checking mags, hidden precise number of cartridges in the magazine
  • By default, it is unknown how many cartridges are in the mag, if it is not examined (hereinafter referred to as "Unknown/Checked"). Mag counter displays an unknown number of cartridges. For example: (?/30)
  • Check accuracy is determined by new "Mag Drills" skill.
  • The magazine can be checked either by animation - Alt+T or through the interface by Right-clicking and selecting Check magazine.
  • If you checked the number on the 0 skill level, then it returns "~empty" - "<1/2" - "~1/2" - ">1/2" - "~full". As skill level 1 an approximate number will be shown. On level 2 - the precise amount of ammo will be provided.
  • Full and empty mags are considered to be checked.
  • All the magazines you take into the raid are checked automatically.
  • Loading/unloading a checked mag doesn’t change the state, it remains checked.
  • After firing, the number of cartridges in the magazine become unknown.
  • Ammo check precision now depends on the Mag Drills skill, not on Weapon Mastering.
  • Outside of the raid, the number of cartridges is always displayed precisely.
  • If you have dropped a checked mag and picked it back up, it remains checked. If someone picked it up and dropped it again, it becomes unknown to you.
Checking the chamber
  • The chamber also requires checking. Bnly by animation using the key binding Shift + T.
  • If you load the cartridge into an unknown chamber, it automatically becomes checked.
  • If the shot was fired from a checked mag (first shot), the chamber remains checked. Otherwise, it becomes unknown as well.
New location:
Equipment:
Bags:
Tactical Vests:
Body armor:
Helmets:
Weapon modifications:
Cases:
Weapons:
AI Improvements:
Optimizations:
Fixed:
Changes:
Known issues:
submitted by LewisUK_ to EscapefromTarkov [link] [comments]

Getting frustrated with Ubuntu. Are my experiences the norm for a Linux user?

Let me start off by saying that I'm not a total newb, but still pretty green. I like to believe I'm capable with computers, and know enough to figure out most issues. I also have a pretty solid general understanding of how they function. Been a Windows user most of my life, but decided to make the switch to Linux a few years back.
My experiences thus far are making me reconsider the switch, despite the fact that I've really become opposed to using Windows. I'm curious if I should expect more of the same indefinitely, or if my experiences up to this point are unusual, and I should expect to reach a point where I can just use the OS, instead of spend hours trying to perform every task.
It all started when I downloaded Ubuntu about three years ago. I easily got it installed as a dual boot on a Windows machine. Had to start by allocating disk space in Windows for the new Linux install, prepared a live usb, went through the install, cake. Then I started trying to do stuff, like use a printer. Well HP doesn't make a driver for Linux and, probably, 2-4 hours of research led to me still not having a working printer. I found a driver, but the process to get it installed did not work as it was supposed to. I forget the specifics, but I followed a tutorial to the T, but ran into unforeseen installation issues, and never could figure out how to get the process complete.
After that I started running into issues with the FireFox browser. I've alwasy used FF on Windows with no issues. On Ubuntu it ran slower than dial-up from the mid-90's. Again, 2-4 hours worth of research and several changes to things like FF settings, disabling add-ons, etc., and I still had no fix.
Still I wasn't deterred. Then the dual boot broke. I tried boot repair. No dice. Tried for several hours to get it working. Asked about it on forums, sent in results of boot repair (where I forget) only to get no response, and finally I threw in the towel.
I also struggled to get Bitcoin Armory working, with some very frustrating success, but I didn't count that against Linux, since it was very new software, and I wasn't surprised it was buggy.
Fast forward to today. I've been using Windows for a couple years, with few attempts made to use Linux, except for trying to retrieve a very small amount of BTC from Armory, which consumed about three weekends of my life to finally achieve.
Now I've decided to give it another go. I downloaded UbuntuStudio b/c I'd like to use some of the music production software that comes with it.
Following some tutorials online, I tried to connect my midi keyboard to the computer using QJackCtl. I couldn't remember the issue that I ran into when starting to type this up, so I tried to repeat the process, only to have the program crash during start up, three times. The computer had literally just restarted 20 minutes ago, so I doubt a reboot would work, but maybe. It's almost funny at this point. I'm really disappointed that I can't get the audio software that came with the distro working "fresh out of the box." Maybe with a few hours, or weekends, worth of research?
I've also been getting a system error message every time I login. I posted a query on the Ubuntu forums. That issue has yet to be sorted out.
I hesitate to include this next part, because it involves software that is really still in it's early stages, and I'm trying to be realistic in taking the perspective that any problems I encounter are with the new software, not Ubuntu, but the fact that I had zero problems getting the same stuff to work in Windows just adds to my frustration with Ubuntu.
Everything I'm about to describe is involved with installing monero mining and wallet software. The exception is the AMD drivers needed for the GPU I'm using to mine. Those I expected to work without issue. I followed the directions for installing the AMD drivers for Ubuntu on the AMD website, and the program would not work. After, you guessed it, 2-4 hours of research, I finally, almost by accident, installed an older version of the driver software. Boom, it worked. WTF man?! When I installed the Windows version it took 2 minutes.
Moving on, I tried getting the xmr-stak mining software working. This took me several hours, spread over several days to sort out. Same with the monero-gui wallet, which actually I've only got half-way working. In fact, I've tried installing the monero-gui by two different ways. In the process I've inadvertently got the monerod daemon running, but not the gui. Actually, the monerod daemon starts with the computer and I haven't even started trying to figure out how to turn that off, since what's the point of having it run if I can't use the gui?
In Windows I had all of this up and running in a couple of hours. And in saying that I'm prepared for the "if you like Windows so much then use that!" or "you're just too thick to figure it out!", but I don't like Windows, and I don't think it's a matter of not figuring it out. It seems to me that the reason I've spent dozens of hours just trying to get things to work in Linux is that nearly every time I've tried to do something, there is inevatably some error along the way where following the directions isn't good enough, and sorting out the issue is a feat in and of itself.
I just want to know if this is unusual, or if this is how it's going to go forever if I keep using Linux. Is my experience typical?
TL;DR: I've had a litany of issues and spent countless hours trying to fix them using Linux. Is this rare, and I've just had an unusual experience, or actually pretty common, and I should just accept it as the cost of using an open source OS?
submitted by rtfioeti to Ubuntu [link] [comments]

Hi Im a newby and I want to buy some safecoins. How can I proceed simply?

submitted by openminded2014 to maidsafe [link] [comments]

[Reupload][Tutorial] Install Armory Wallet 0.96.4 on Fedora Workstation 29

note: I had to reupload this because reddit is banning my original account for no reason. I appealed but I thought maybe someone wanted to have this content online.
Armory is a very cool open source bitcoin wallet for the power user. You can do neat things with it, read here: https://www.bitcoinarmory.com/
Disclaimer: follow these steps at your own risk. I am not responsible for any damage / loss of funds you might face for following or not following correctly my instructions here. I may have made a typo somewhere or be wrong so do your own research and learn for yourself what I am doing at each step, and what consequences may have for you, at your own risk. These instructions may be wrong somewhere. It worked for me, it doesn't mean it has to work for you.
Requirements for this tutorial:
We are going to build the code from source.
Install dependencies.
I followed these instructions to find the equivalent Fedora packages:
Open the terminal app and run this command:
sudo dnf install git nano qt qt-devel python-devel libtool pyqt4 pyqt4-devel lmdb swig 
And more python packages that I had to install:
sudo pip install twisted qt4reactor psutil 
Importing the signing key to verify the software
Install KGPG to easily manage keys.
sudo dnf install kgpg 
Go to
https://keyserver.ubuntu.com/pks/lookup?op=get&search=0x8C5211764922589A
and copy paste the code below the title from
-----BEGIN PGP PUBLIC KEY BLOCK-----
to
-----END PGP PUBLIC KEY BLOCK-----
both included. Then open KGPG from terminal with
kgpg -k 
and click 'Import Key...' > Clipboard > Ok . You should see a confirmation message. Double check the info and close the dialog.
Repeat the process with this other key:
https://keyserver.ubuntu.com/pks/lookup?op=get&search=0xA4FC919E85C595BA
You can verify both keys are mentioned at the Armory webpage.
Clone and compile the code plus some edits
Before, we installed some dependencies that are named differently than the equivalent Ubuntu/Debian package specified at the Armory documentation. The build process fails for Fedora as the name for the dependency during checks won't match the Fedora version. There's this pull request addressing that, but the code is not part of any release yet.
So the fastest workaround (maybe a bit dirty) was to edit the build config file and correct the name for my Fedora install. Let's begin.
Clone the Armory repository
git clone https://github.com/goatpig/BitcoinArmory.git 
Enter the BitcoinArmory dir
cd BitcoinArmory 
Switch to release code
git checkout 'v0.96.4' 
Verify commit signature
git tag -v 'v0.96.4' 
you should see the following message:
> object fee1f91a3137ef1056e15cc606a186b0e508f84c > type commit > tag v0.96.4 > tagger goatpig  1522530739 +0200 > > v0.96.4 > gpg: Signature made Sat 31 Mar 2018 11:12:19 PM CEST > gpg: using RSA key 8C5211764922589A > gpg: Good signature from "goatpig (Offline signing key for Armory releases) " > gpg: WARNING: This key is not certified with a trusted signature! > gpg: There is no indication that the signature belongs to the owner. > Primary key fingerprint: 745D 707F BA53 968B DF63 AA8D 8C52 1176 4922 589A 
if it looks the same, everything is ok.
Edit the file 'Makefile' file with
gedit Makefile 
And click the three dot menu > Find and Replace...
Configure the options as follows:
https://i.imgur.com/hpS01Kd.png
Click Replace All and close.
Go back to the terminal and run the following commands in order from inside the BitcoinArmory dir. Wait for the previous one to finish before running the next one:
./autogen.sh 
...
./configure 
...
make 
if everything finishes without error you are all done! Run this to start Armory:
python ./ArmoryQt.py 
you are all set. Please let me know if I missed something.
submitted by RedditShadowbangedMe to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

[Tutorial] Install Armory Wallet 0.96.4 on Fedora Workstation 29

Armory is a very cool open source bitcoin wallet for the power user. You can do neat things with it, read here: https://www.bitcoinarmory.com/
Disclaimer: follow these steps at your own risk. I am not responsible for any damage / loss of funds you might face for following or not following correctly my instructions here. I may have made a typo somewhere or be wrong so do your own research and learn for yourself what I am doing at each step, and what consequences may have for you, at your own risk. These instructions may be wrong somewhere. It worked for me, it doesn't mean it has to work for you.
Requirements for this tutorial:
We are going to build the code from source.
Install dependencies.
I followed these instructions to find the equivalent Fedora packages:
Open the terminal app and run this command:
sudo dnf install git nano qt qt-devel python-devel libtool pyqt4 pyqt4-devel lmdb swig 
And more python packages that I had to install:
sudo pip install twisted qt4reactor psutil 
Importing the signing key to verify the software
Install KGPG to easily manage keys.
sudo dnf install kgpg 
Go to
https://keyserver.ubuntu.com/pks/lookup?op=get&search=0x8C5211764922589A
and copy paste the code below the title from
-----BEGIN PGP PUBLIC KEY BLOCK-----
to
-----END PGP PUBLIC KEY BLOCK-----
both included. Then open KGPG from terminal with
kgpg -k 
and click 'Import Key...' > Clipboard > Ok . You should see a confirmation message. Double check the info and close the dialog.
Repeat the process with this other key:
https://keyserver.ubuntu.com/pks/lookup?op=get&search=0xA4FC919E85C595BA
You can verify both keys are mentioned at the Armory webpage.
Clone and compile the code plus some edits
Before, we installed some dependencies that are named differently than the equivalent Ubuntu/Debian package specified at the Armory documentation. The build process fails for Fedora as the name for the dependency during checks won't match the Fedora version. There's this pull request addressing that, but the code is not part of any release yet.
So the fastest workaround (maybe a bit dirty) was to edit the build config file and correct the name for my Fedora install. Let's begin.
Clone the Armory repository
git clone https://github.com/goatpig/BitcoinArmory.git 
Enter the BitcoinArmory dir
cd BitcoinArmory 
Switch to release code
git checkout 'v0.96.4' 
Verify commit signature
git tag -v 'v0.96.4' 
you should see the following message:
> object fee1f91a3137ef1056e15cc606a186b0e508f84c > type commit > tag v0.96.4 > tagger goatpig  1522530739 +0200 > > v0.96.4 > gpg: Signature made Sat 31 Mar 2018 11:12:19 PM CEST > gpg: using RSA key 8C5211764922589A > gpg: Good signature from "goatpig (Offline signing key for Armory releases) " > gpg: WARNING: This key is not certified with a trusted signature! > gpg: There is no indication that the signature belongs to the owner. > Primary key fingerprint: 745D 707F BA53 968B DF63 AA8D 8C52 1176 4922 589A 
if it looks the same, everything is ok.
Edit the file 'Makefile' file with
gedit Makefile 
And click the three dot menu > Find and Replace...
Configure the options as follows:
https://i.imgur.com/hpS01Kd.png
Click Replace All and close.
Go back to the terminal and run the following commands in order from inside the BitcoinArmory dir. Wait for the previous one to finish before running the next one:
./autogen.sh 
...
./configure 
...
make 
if everything finishes without error you are all done! Run this to start Armory:
python ./ArmoryQt.py 
you are all set. Please let me know if I missed something.
edit: cd git dir.
submitted by AmbitiousSpeed0 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

The World Wide Web runs on webservers in datacenters. The World Wide Blockchain should also run on "blockservers" in datacenters. The "sweet spot" of Bitcoin scaling, reliability, security & convenience is *nodes in the cloud* + *private keys offline*. The is the future of Bitcoin. Let's embrace it.

Four-Line Summary
(1) Bitcoin nodes (and everyone's public addresses) should be online - in datacenters.
(2) Bitcoin wallets (and your private keys) should be offline - in your pocket.
(3) This architecture provides the optimal combination or "sweet spot" for short-term and long-term Bitcoin scaling, reliability, security & convenience.
(4) The best communications strategy is for us to embrace the approach of "nodes-in-datacenters" a/k/a "blockservers-in-the-cloud" - instead of apologizing for it.
Longer Summary
(1) Bitcoin nodes should be online - on "online public blockservers", ideally running on big, powerful webservers with high connectivity & high-end specs, in datacenters.
(2) Bitcoin private keys should be offline - in "offline private wallets", ideally running on tiny, cheap computers with no connectivity & low-end specs, in your pocket.
https://blockchainbdgpzk.onion/pushtx
(3) We should embrace "nodes-in-datacenters" (ie, "blockservers-in-the-cloud") and "keys-in-your-pocket" as the future of Bitcoin, providing the optimal combination (or "sweet spot") of scaling, reliability, security & convenience.
Details
Bitcoin has been a success for 7 years and is continuing to grow and needs a simple and safe way to scale.
So, now it is time for people to embrace nodes-in-datacenters a/k/a blockservers-in-the-cloud (plus private keys offline - to enable 100% security with "offline signing of transactions") as Bitcoin's future.
Why?
(1) ...because everything on the web actually works this way already - providing the optimal combination of scaling, reliability, security & convenience.
  • You already keep your passwords for websites and webmail on you - usually physically offline (in your head, written on a slip of paper, or maybe in an offline file, etc.)
  • When was the last time you ran a server out of your home to continually spider and index terabytes of data for the entire web?
  • Why should you need to hold 60 GB of data (and growing) when you just want to check the balance of a single Bitcoin address (eg, one of your addresses)?
  • Bitcoin is still very young, and if in order to fulfill its earlier promise about banking the unbanked, microtransactions, DACs (decentralized autonomous corporations), IoT (Internet of Things), smart contracts, etc., then we should hope and expect that the blockchain will someday take up terabytes, not "mere" gigabytes - just like Google's giant search engine index, which they update every few minutes.
  • Do you really think you should be performing this kind of heavy-duty indexing, querying and "serving" on a low-end machine behind a low-end connection in your home, when companies like Google can do it so much better?
  • As long as you physically control your own private keys, who cares if you rely on blockchain.info or blockexplorer.com (or someday: bitcoin.google.com or bitcoin.msn.com or bitcoin.yahoo.com) to lookup up public information about balances and transactions on Bitcoin addresses?
  • They're not going to be able to lie to you. The meaning of "permissionless" and "decentralized" is that anybody can set up a full-node / "blockserver" (plus "blockchain search engines"), and anybody can (and will) immediately report it to the whole world if a website like blockchain.info or blockexplorer.com (or someday: bitcoin.google.com or bitcoin.msn.com or bitcoin.yahoo.com) provides false information - which would seriously damage their business, so they'll never do it.
(2) ...because webservers and webmail don't lie to you, and "nodes-in-datacenters" (ie, "blockservers-in-the-cloud") aren't going to be able to lie to you either - since it would not be in their interest, and they would get caught if they did.
  • When was the last time google.com or or yahoo.com or msn.com (bing.com) lied to you when you performed a search or looked up some news?
  • When was the last time blockchain.info or blockexplorer.com lied to you when you checked the balance at a Bitcoin address?
  • Currently, with billions of websites and news sources ("webservers") running around the world in datacenters, there are "web search engines" (eg, google.com or news.google.com or msn.com or yahoo.com) where you can look up information and news on the World Wide Web. In order to survive, the business model of these "web search engines" is about getting lots of visitors, and providing you with reliable information. It's not in their best interests to lie - so they never do. These sites simply "spider" / "crawl" / "index" the entire massive web out there (every few minutes actually), and then conveniently filter / aggregate / present the results as a free service to you.
  • In the future, when there are 10,000 or 100,000 Bitcoin full-nodes ("blockservers") running around the world in datacenters, there will be "blockchain search engines" (eg, bitcoin.google.com or bitcoin.msn.com or bitcoin.yahoo.com - just like we already have blockchain.info and blockexplorer.com, etc.) where you will be able to lookup transactions and balances on the World Wide Blockchain. In order to survive, their business model will be about getting lots of visitors, and providing you with reliable information. It's not going to be in their best interests to lie - so they never will. These sites will simply "spider" / "crawl" / "index" the entire massive blockchain out there (every few minutes actually), and then conveniently filter / aggregate / present the results as a free service to you.
  • The business model for "blockchain search engines" might eventually showing ads or sponsored content along with the Bitcoin blockchain search functions which we are primarily interested in. This would be quite usable and simple and safe, and similar to how most people already use sites like google.com, yahoo.com, msn.com, etc.
(3) ...because "nodes-in-datacenters" (ie, "blockservers-in-the-cloud") provide simple scaling now.
  • Nodes-in-the-cloud are the only solution which can provide scaling now - using existing, tested software - by simply adjusting - or totally eliminating - the MAXBLOCKSIZE parameter.
  • They can use existing, tested, reliable software: thousands of 2MB+ nodes are already running.
  • About 1,000 Classic nodes have been spun up in AWS ECS datacenters (Amazon Web Services - Elastic Computer Cloud) in the past month. (Uninformed yes-men at r\bitcoin try to spin this as a "bad thing" - but we should embrace it as a "good thing", explicitly espousing the philosophy outlined in this post.)
  • "Nodes-in-datacenters" (ie, "blockservers-in-the-cloud") can be flexibly and easily configured to provide all the scaling needed in terms of:
    • Bandwidth (throughput)
    • Hard drive space (storage)
    • RAM (memory)
    • CPU (processing power)
  • The yes-men and sycophants and authoritarians and know-nothings on the censored subreddit r\bitcoin are forever fantasizing about some Rube Goldberg vaporware with a catchy name "Lightning Network" which doesn't even exist, and which (at best, if it ever does come into existence) would be doomed to be slow, centralized and expensive. LN is a non-thing.
  • Those same people on the censored r\bitcoin forum are desperately trying to interpret the thousands of Classic nodes as a negative thing - and their beloved non-existent Lightning Network as a positive thing. This is the kind of typical down-is-up, black-is-white thinking that always happens in a censorship bubble - because the so-called Lightning Network isn't even a thing - while Classic is a reality.
(4) ...because "nodes-in-datacenters" (ie, "blockservers-in-the-cloud") provide more reliability / availability.
  • 24/7/365 tech support,
  • automatic server reboots,
  • server uptime guarantees,
  • electrical power uptime guarantees.
(5) ...because "nodes-in-datacenters" (ie, "blockservers-in-the-cloud") provide better security.
(6) ...because "nodes-in-datacenters" (ie, "blockservers-in-the-cloud") provide more convenience.
(7) ...because separating "full-node" functionality from "wallet" functionality by implementing "hierarchical deterministic (HD)" wallets is cleaner, safer and more user-friendly.
Armory, BIP 0032 provide "hierarchical deterministic (HD)" wallets.
https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/BIP_0032
https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Deterministic_Wallet
http://www.bitcoinarmory.com/tutorials/armory-advanced-features/offline-wallets/
https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/How_to_set_up_a_secure_offline_savings_wallet
http://bitcoin.stackexchange.com/questions/16646/offline-wallets-electrum-vs-armory
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DQumISxkJsQ
  • "Hierarchical deterministic" wallets are required in order to be able to keep private keys offline, and "offline-sign" transactions. This is because a wallet needs to be "deterministic" in order to be able to generate the same sequence of random private keys in the offline wallet and the online wallet.
  • "Hierarchical deterministic (HD)" wallets are also required in order to allow a user to perform a single, one-time, permanent backup of their wallet - which lasts forever (since a HD wallet already deterministically "knows" the exact sequence of all the private keys which it will generate, now and in the future - unlike the antiquated wallet in Core / Blockstream's insecure, non-user-friendly Bitcoin implementation, which pre-generates keys non-deterministically in batches of 100 - so old backups of Core / Blockstream wallets could actually be missing later-generated private keys, rendering those backups useless).
  • Bitcoin is now over 7 years old, but Core / Blockstream has mysteriously failed to provide this simple, essential feature of HD wallets - while several other Bitcoin implementations have already provided this.
  • This feature is extremely simple, because it is all done entirely offline - not networking, no game theory, no non-deterministic behavior, no concurrency. The "HD wallet" functionality just needs some very basic, standard crypto and random-number libraries to generate a "seed" which determines the entire sequence of all the private keys which the wallet can generate.
  • Newer Bitcoin implementations (unlike Core / Blockstream) have now "modularized" their code, also separating "full-node" functionality from "wallet" functionality at the source code level:
  • in Golang - "btcsuite" from Conformal, providing "btcd" (node) and "btcwallet" (wallet):
  • in Haskell + MySQL/SQLite - "Haskoin":
  • There is also a Bitcoin implementation which provides only a full-node:
  • in Ruby + Postgres - "Toshi" from CoinBase:
  • [Tinfoil] The fact that Core / Blockstream has failed to provide HD and failed to clean up and modularize its messy spaghetti code - and the fact that Armory is now out of business (and both companies received millions of dollars in venture capital, and the lead dev of Armory left because the investors were creating needless obstacles regarding intellectual property rights, licensing, etc.) - these facts are suspicious because suggest that these corporations may be trying to discourage dev-friendliness, user-friendliness, security, convenience, and on-chain scaling.
(8) ...because the only thing most users really want and need is total physical control over their private keys.
  • Most people do not want or need to run a Bitcoin full-node, because:
    • A Bitcon full-node consumes lots of disk space and bandwidth, and can be expensive and complicated to set up, run, maintain, and secure.
    • A Bitcoin full-node requires an extremely high level of hardware and software security - which most computer users have never even attempted.
  • As Armory or Electrum users know, the simplest and safest way to provide 100% guaranteed security is by using "offline storage" or "cold storage" or "air gap".
  • In other words, ideally, you should never even let your private keys touch a device which has (or had) the hardware and/or software to go online - ie: no Wi-Fi, no 3G, and no Ethernet cable.
  • This offline machine is used only to generate private keys (where a Bitcoin private key is literally actually just any truly random number up to around 1078 ) - and also used to "offline-sign" transactions.
  • So it is simplest and safest if your private keys are on an offline machine which never can / did go online - and such as machine can be very cheap, because it really only needs to run some very basic random-number-generator and crypto libraries.
  • It would be simplest and safest for people to own a tiny cheap 100% secure offline computer to use only for:
    • generating / storing Bitcoin private keys
    • signing Bitcoin transactions
    • possibly also for generating / storing other kinds of private keys (other cryptocurrencies, GPG keys, etc.)
Four-Line Summary / Conclusion:
(1) Bitcoin nodes (and everyone's public addresses) should be online - in datacenters.
(2) Bitcoin wallets (and your private keys) should be offline - in your pocket.
(3) This architecture provides the optimal combination or "sweet spot" for short-term and long-term Bitcoin scaling, reliability, security & convenience.
(4) The best communications strategy is for us to embrace the approach of "nodes-in-datacenters" a/k/a "blockservers-in-the-cloud" - instead of apologizing for it.
submitted by ydtm to btc [link] [comments]

Super noob post: how do I store Myriad "securely"?

Hi I currently have a Bitcoin wallet on Armory, and I've downloaded MyriadCore yesterday. Now that it's updated, I'd like to maybe start mining but I don't know where to store my potential coins! I couldn't find a FAQ on your website or Reddit, and the mining tutorial didn't include an answer to my question. Anyway, am I able to store Myriad coins the same way I store my Bitcoins? Thanks (please don't bully me)
submitted by edgar01600 to myriadcoin [link] [comments]

Pi Wallet - Secure your coins now

Hello,
I am Mario, director of CryptoCoins Consulting Ltd. and I'd like to present our latest project - a secure offline hardware wallet, the Pi Wallet
A lot of people are scared to lose their coins - and thats quite reasonable. The Solution? Just save your bitcoins offline. Unfortunately this limits the use of coins in so far as you'll get problems when you eventually want to use them, because thats where you have to connect to the internet. Armory ( https://bitcoinarmory.com ) solved that problem by providing an option to sign transactions offline. I am sure some of you already use it. The problem with such a secure armory offline wallet is that you need an additional offline computer where it runs on. While some of you use an old computer for armory, others don't have that option and they have to buy a new one and set it up.
We addressed that problem by developing Pi Wallet. Pi Wallet is like one of these offline computers - just better:
-unlike a lot of notebooks Pi Wallet doesn't have a wireless connection
-with Pi Wallet easily fitting into your hand you save a lot of space and you can even take it with you easily if necessary
-unlike a notebook the Pi Wallet device can be easily separated from its hard drive, the SDHC card.
-you can take your coins wherever you want by just moving the card around
-Pi Wallet comes with 2 SDHC cards so you can always have the backup card stored on a safe place
-since Pi Wallet comes with everything already pre-installed, you don't need to set up anything except your wallet, which is done with a simple click
-there are videos available on pi-wallet.com which explain in detail how to use Armory so you won't have to read up on it
-with Armory you can have a copy of your wallet allowing you to create receiving addresses and unsigned transactions and check your balance on an online computer running Armory without having to expose your private keys
As you can see we have improved existing and working Solutions. Pi wallet is small - it fits into your hand, it can be used right away when delivered, it uses the most secure and feature rich bitcoin client and it allows a fast and secure creation of backups (digital+paper)
Of course the deployed operating system ( http://www.raspbian.org ) as well as Armory are open source. Everyone can build is own Pi Wallet. Tutorials can be found at http://www.pi-wallet.com/pages/build-your-own-pi-wallet
Mario CryptoCoins Consulting Ltd.
submitted by CCC_Ltd to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Be your own bank: Store your bitcoin without getting robbed.

There are countless examples of bitcoin theft, and every time I hear another story about coins being stolen it hurts.
It hurts because I hate to see someone get ripped off, and it hurts because it erodes public confidence in Bitcoin.
There are three methods by which your bitcoin can be stolen:
  1. Human error - Sorry, it’s your fault. Even if it is someone else’s error, you trusted them
  2. Coercion - You were persuaded by use of force or threats
  3. Stolen backup - keep them safe!
The guidelines below will help you avoid bitcoin theft.
This is not meant to be a definitive guide, it is a solid foundation, and there are many things you could do to enhance this security further.
The basics:
Protect your privacy
Do not reuse addresses. If you have a public address, like a donation address, empty it often.
Do not talk about holding large amounts of bitcoin (just common sense…)
Trust no one
Bitcoin is trust-less, use it that way
No web wallets, No web wallets, No web wallets.
Do not store bitcoin on exchanges, always use 2FA (Two factor authentication), I use Google Authenticator
Create and store your own private keys
Remove any remote desktop software (team viewer, gotomypc, etc..) from a computer with private keys
Use unique strong passwords
Use a secure password manager for your logins (I use pwSafe)
Do not store private keys or wallet passwords in a password manager
My cold storage wallet passwords are written on a piece of paper and kept locked up
Do not use the same password on multiple sites or wallets
Include upper and lower case letters, numbers and special characters
Strong password example: /ZjucKn=0Eb;%@u[Zp
Use good antivirus protection (I use Bitdefender on mac)
Keep it up to date
Consider physical security
If you store your 2nd wallet backup in the glove compartment of your car, and your car gets stolen, your bitcoins may be gone too…
Mobile devices: Do not use the same pin to unlock your phone and wallet
Protect your backups
Keep backups
Whenever I create a new wallet I create 2 full paper backups including the seed and any other security (password, pin, etc…).
I write these on paper by hand
I only use HD and paper wallets, all the tools below are HD.
My backups are physically secure and stored in geographically distinct locations
My wife (yes, I trust her ;)) knows where they are and how to use them in case I’m incapacited
The tools I use:
  1. Paper - https://www.bitaddress.org I use bitaddress.org on an old laptop that is permanently offline, and print on a trusted, non-networked printer. Source: https://github.com/pointbiz/bitaddress.org
  2. Armory (offline) - https://bitcoinarmory.com/ That same old laptop contains an offline version of Armory for my cold storage, tutorial: https://bitcoinarmory.com/tutorials/armory-advanced-features/offline-wallets/
  3. Armory (online) - Used for signing transactions and small amounts of coin, when online I don’t type my password, I use the mouse and jumbled screen keypad
  4. Trezor - https://buytrezor.com?a=859328776dca (that is my affiliate link) Great hardware wallet, very secure and very hard to “screw up”, $119
  5. Breadwallet - http://app.breadwallet.com/ Open source iOS app, I keep a little change here for every day spending
Other tools I like:
Electrum (Android version) https://electrum.org/
mSIGNA (in beta, lots of potential) https://ciphrex.com/products/
Please feel free to correct me or supplement this in any way that increases security.
Stay safe.
submitted by CoinCadence to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Armory wallet question

I'm looking into armory, and its a lot to take in.
I do have a question though, how do you update your offline wallet balance there? I know that your watch only copy will have a balance on it so you can spend money.

but what if you receive say 1 bitcoin, how do you transfer that too the offline wallet? I watched the 15 min tutorial but it only sayd, if you want to deposit money you can use this address. but that still does not explain how the offline wallet can update the balance
submitted by -icecat to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Best way to store Bitcoins for 5 years

Hey! I just bought some bitcoin on an exchange website. As I plan to keep them for a while (5 years maybe, something like that), I'd like to know what the best way of keeping my Bitcoins secure.
I read lots of tutorials but there are so many methods... Here is what I thought to do, could you give me a feedback please?
1) Download a Ubuntu Live CD and put it on a USB stick
2) Start my everyday notebook with the USB stick, launching Ubuntu
3) Create an offline wallet using either bitadress, Armory or something else. Which one is the safest you think?
4) Encrypt the wallet using TrueCrypt
5) Burn it on a disc or putting it on multiple USB stick
6) Check the balance with blockexplorer
And if I want to recover the money, I launch Ubuntu Live CD, this time connected to the internet, decrypt the wallet, import it via Armory then transfer the Bitcoins to some exchange website.
Does that sound right? Is it better to look for paper wallet?
Thanks!
submitted by Pixandco to BitcoinWallet [link] [comments]

Armory Cold Storage Questions

So I know there's been posts on this topic before, as well as other guides online, but I still have a few questions after reading them that I was hoping you all could answer. The Bitcoin Armory site has directions for cold storage, but they are pretty general and don't go much into the specifics, so I am using this tutorial as my starting point:
http://falkvinge.net/2014/02/10/placing-your-crypto-wealth-in-cold-storage-installing-armory-on-ubuntu/
So I guess my first question is, is there anything blatantly wrong that you guys see with this tutorial?
2.) Why does the tutorial recommend Ubuntu LTS, is there something you guys would recommend more?
3.) Are python-qt4, python-twisted, and python-psutil still the packages needed to be installed for Armory to function? This article is about 8 months old, so are the directions for installing apt-offline and those three packages still correct?
4.) When downloading Armory on the online computer in order to install on the offline computer, I would like to verify the signature of the download. However, the computer that I currently own is a Mac, and the Armory website says that verifying the signatures is only easily performed on a Linux Machine. I was planning on purchasing a cheap computer to install Linux on and use as my cold storage. I can't imagine that I must purchase two; one to download Armory on and one to use as my cold storage. Could anyone here walk me through how to either verify the signature on a Mac or let me know of some other way to do this securely?
5.) At the bottom on Armory's tutorial, they recommend disabling autorun functionality for USB's in the case of USB virus's (highly unlikely, but if there's something that can be done to prevent it, why not). They link to instructions for Windows, and I was wondering if anyone knew how to get this done on Ubuntu.
I apologize if these questions have been answered before, but I was unable to find them. Thank you in advance for all the help and I appreciate your time; I know topics like this are pretty boring to read/answer compared to the other stuff that's usually posted on bitcoin.
submitted by ArmoryQuestions to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Anyone have feedback on using Electrum for cold storage or paper wallets?

I wouldn't consider myself a noob at this, exactly, but I thought I'd seek some guidance anyway. Can never be too careful with this stuff. Armory wasn't cutting it, had too many dependencies, and needed twice the space on the online machine compared to Bitcoin-Qt.
I'd like to know some opinions from people who have used Electrum for cold storage. I'll be using the tutorials on their site. Any pitfalls? Anyone got advice against it, security wise? Any negative opinions?
submitted by sue-dough-nim to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Is my plan for storing my bitcoin secure?

I've been having a hard time understanding how to properly secure my bitcoin. I've done some research and this is what I came up with. Please let me know if this a safe way to store my coins.
  1. Download Bitcoin-qt wallet and sync it with the network
  2. Download the armory client
  3. Disconnect computer from the internet
  4. Create new wallet through armory
  5. Print out paper wallet (several copies)
  6. Create a digital back up to store on a flash drive
  7. Create a watch only wallet
  8. Delete the actual wallet from my computer and leave the "watch only wallet" on my computer
  9. Reconnect to the internet
I realize that this has some issues such as my computer having a key logger, but I think the odds of that are fairly low. I currently have a little over 2 BTC and I want to be reasonably sure that they are safe so is this enough? Would you be happy if this is how your BTC were stored?
EDIT: I just saw this tutorial http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rYjH16zbf38 Would this be a safer way of storing my coin? Will I be able to check my balance and confirm that the transactions to the wallet are going through by going to https://blockchain.info/address/MYPUBLICADDRESS
submitted by KingFisher9 to BitcoinBeginners [link] [comments]

Which wallet program?

So... I've watched tutorials, I've read articles, I've listened to podcasts, and I've clicked through countless pages of this subreddit. I think I now understand well enough what a bitcoin is and how it operates. But... when it comes to wallets, I'm stumped. Is there a wallet program (or online wallet) that you recommend? I'm not sure if I should go for multibit, armory, an online wallet, or the bitcoin client itself. So many contradictory opinions and brain-meltingly long comparisons... I can't really make sense of it all.
My chief concerns would be security and low-resource use. Help a brother out :)
Thanks!
submitted by thischarmingdmitri to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

How to install Bitcoin Armory in Ubuntu 14.04 Bitcoin Armory Setup - YouTube Armory Tutorial - Offline Transactions Bitcoin Armory Guide Installing Bitcoin Armory

Bitcoin.org is a community funded project, donations are appreciated and used to improve the website. Make a donation ... Armory es un cliente avanzado de Bitcoin que amplia sus características para usuarios avanzados. Ofrece muchas opciones para respaldar, encriptar y permitir el almacenamiento de su monedero en ordenadores sin conexión. Features: Full Node × Full Node: Some wallets fully ... Armory Armory ist ein erweiterter Bitcoin-Client, der Funktionalitäten für Bitcoin-Power-User ergänzt. Er bietet viele Backup- und Verschlüsselungsfunktionen und ermöglicht sicheres Speichern auf Offline-Rechnern. BEST BITCOIN WALLET. Armory is the most secure and full featured solution available for users and institutions to generate and store Bitcoin private keys. This means users never have to trust the Armory team and can use it with the Glacier Protocol. Satoshi would be proud! Users are empowered with multiple encrypted Bitcoin wallets and permanent one-time ‘paper backups’. Armory pioneered ... Features of Armory Secured Bitcoin Wallet. The wallet offers several features that you should know about, especially since it is one of the first in the industry to have an active offline mode. In the following sections, we go over supported cryptocurrencies, customer support, interface, security, and fees. Available Currencies That You Can Store. Since its beginning, Armory was meant for ... With the Armory bitcoin wallet, you can set up a bitcoin offline wallet. I am going to explain simple steps into setting up an Armory offline bitcoin wallet in this tutorial. You only need to follow these steps to have a successful offline Bitcoin wallet. When first thinking of Bitcoin you may not of realized you need a wallet but you do and ...

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How to install Bitcoin Armory in Ubuntu 14.04

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